Eid Mubarak! Here's five iconic Eid dishes that make the feasting truly glorious!

If in India and Pakistan, Eid is synonymous with Biryani. But in Afghanistan, it's Bolani!

 |  2-minute read |   05-06-2019
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A month of rigorous fasting ends at plates full of delicacies on the occasion of Eid. But what's absolutely surprising about Eid is that if you take a food tour across the world, you will end up with different plates.

For example, in India and Pakistan, Eid is synonymous with Biryani. But in Afghanistan, it's Bolani — stuffed flatbread. 

Here are five dishes which make Eid complete:

Biryani

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Biryani has an interesting history. It's believed that the word was derived from the Persian 'Birian' which means fried before cooking. The Mughals are credited with bringing this dish to India from Persia. One legend says Mumtaz Mahal wanted Mughal soldiers to be fed with meat and rice — which resulted in Biriyani.

It is the one thing that Eid can't do without.

Sheer Kurma

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Sheer Kurma, too, has its origins in Persia. It's a sweet dish made of milk, vermicelli, sugar and dry fruits. Sheer means milk in Persian and Khurma means dates. It can be had hot and cold.

Chicken Korma

Korma has its roots in the Mughlai kitchen. The word represents any dish that contains either vegetables or meat that is cooked in yoghurt and is therefore less spicy hot than pure masala-based cooking.

Haleem

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The origin of haleem apparently lies in the popular Arabian dish known as Harees (also written as Jareesh). According to Shoaib Daniyal, writing in The Sunday Guardian, the first written recipe of Harees dates back to the 10th century, when Arab scribe Abu Muhammad al-Muzaffar ibn Sayyar compiled a cookbook of dishes popular with the "kings and caliphs and lords and leaders" of Baghdad.

Haleem is made of wheat, barley, meat (usually minced beef or mutton, goat meat or lamb, or chicken), lentils and spices, sometimes, rice is also used. This dish is slow-cooked for seven to eight hours, which results in a paste-like consistency, blending softly the flavours of spices, meat, barley and wheat.

Phirni

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A chilled, milky sweet dish favoured with saffron and cardamom which can be the best wrap of an Eid fest.

(Photo: India Today, Twitter, YouTube)

Also Read: Why the confusion over sighting of the moon to celebrate Eid must end

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