Amit Sengupta

OPEN TO OPINION

English   |   Bangla

Amit Sengupta is a journalist and writer based in Delhi.

POLITICS

 |   8-minute read

NRC and spillover politics: For Bengalis in Cooch Behar enclaves, home is where the hurt is

These Indian citizens have been reduced to 'dots' on the map of border politics.

POLITICS

 |   7-minute read

Assam's Citizenship Bill will only push the state into a Kafkaesque nightmare

The bizarre implementation of National Register of Citizens (NRC) and the proposed Citizenship Amendment Bill have proved a nightmare.

POLITICS

 |   11-minute read

Sterlite police firing: J Snowlin is dead, but Tuticorin is not defeated

Days after the police brutality, terror looms large across the town and villages surrounding the Sterlite plant.

POLITICS

 |   5-minute read

Why Kairana is not listening to BJP this time around

The prevailing sentiment reeks of angst, acrimony and anger.

POLITICS

 |   8-minute read

Why the image of man in a yellow shirt with a sniper shooting at Tuticorin protesters will haunt us

As in Gaza, or in Kashmir, police firing seems to be almost always done to shoot and kill.

POLITICS

 |   7-minute read

More than 50 Palestinians killed by Israeli snipers – there's no end to suffering

Orthopaedics are saying that Palestine will now witness 'a new generation of cripples'.

VARIETY

 |   7-minute read

Why Kafeel Khan’s bail and Asaram found guilty of child rape brought hope

Some court judgments, of late, have raised questions on probe agencies and the judicial process.

VARIETY

 |   6-minute read

Why the Sunderbans and Royal Bengal Tiger are in danger

A slated coal-fired power station is the monster that is threatening to change the entire ecological dynamics of this hot spot.

POLITICS

 |   7-minute read

Kisan Long March shows farmers have decided to make themselves heard

The rally has pointed out to the political, media and business elite that people want economic and social rights, not the communal game.

POLITICS

 |   10-minute read

Why BJP razing Lenin's statue is sad and shameful

It marks the rise and rise of fascism in India, and the violent, pathological power of the one-dimensional neo-Nazi, backed by the mighty Indian state.