Everyday realities of Hindus in Pakistan

How can the first citizens of the soil be asked not to perform rituals on the land of their forbears?

 |  3-minute read |   12-06-2016
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"You are still young, when you grow up you will find this world is different from world of books," I was advised in my childhood.

I am more practical in life now - I have found a very difficult world, but it can change for the better.

pak-hindus_061216032011.jpg Many Hindu and Christian girls are kidnapped and converted.

Some people always try to push the society I live in into conflict - they want to impose their spurious agenda on the majority.

No doubt, a few people have the power to change the society, whether in good and bad ways, but what happens when those with evil designs use religion to their benefit?

Nowadays, the storm of intolerance has been spreading like wildfire across the Asian region, and in Pakistan, you can read chapters of intolerance in many headlines - Ahmedis are targeted, Christians' villages are being set on fire, Shia, Hazara community have it equally difficult et al. Hindus face the same problems as other non-Muslim communities.

They have a majority in the Sindh province of Pakistan. Let me state here that Hindus are indigenous citizens of this land. The queen of time plays cruel games and even the lord of the house is thrown out of his home and becomes the minority on his own land.

Many Hindu and Christian girls are kidnapped and converted.

Especially, in Sindh. I have seen people using religion to protect their crimes and the state is unable to do anything despite knowing what is wrong.

Whenever, I write on injustices done to non-Muslims, I am been told - hey, look at India or Bangladesh, what is happening over there?

Even Indian writers returned their awards and it made big news. In my country, no one returns awards in support of Christians whose houses are set on fire.

A notice board says "religious ceremonies are not allowed".

The question is why do our people live under the shadow of fear or made to read the such warnings - whosoever lives with a different community, walks on the path of uncertainty.

There is no justification of crime, no cover for intolerance with the bundle of excuses.

Hindus are not allowed to perform their religious ceremonies: such warnings are common on notice boards in community buildings in Karachi.

A report says that according to notice board at Kohinoor Plaza, located near Mama Parsi School, Karachi, "Hindus are not allowed to perform their religious ceremonies on the ground - must follow instructions."

It adds that Hindus have complained about the issue but there has been response.

They are allowed to live in their apartments because Muslims don't not want to see them perform rituals on the Plaza grounds (News report in Sindhi newspaper on June 8, 2016).

Think about the children from the Hindu community - how do they grow up in such areas?

When they read hateful and prohibitive messages about them, how do they feel - half the population is forced to live in fear because they practise a different faith.

Why can't Hindus perform their religious ceremonies?

Who spreads such hatred against them? Why doesn't the government take strong action against the perpetrators?

Hindus have been complaining for years, but their complaints have no value in the eyes of local authorities.

It is a serious issue that in a city like Karachi, such incidents, which promote extremism, are reported.

Intolerance has no soul, it doesn't spare innocents - it can only turn world into hell.

The state ought to realise that such destructive minds harm our society and weaken the strength of citizens.

All citizens are equal, according to Pakistan's Constitution. But does not such hatred on the notice boards of the country go against it?

Hindus, who are equal first citizens of the soil, are asked not to perform rituals on the land of their forbears.

It time they walked freely in their land, with their heads held high, where no one tells them "you are not allowed".

Writer

Veengas Veengas @veengasj

She is a journalist based in Karachi. She has worked on political, human rights and minority issues and works at regional and English newspapers.

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